Thursday, November 6, 2014

Comfy Cozy Sweatshirt

I hate winter clothes. There, I said it. I hate being cold, I hate wearing lots of layers, and I can't stand being bundled up inside my own house. If I lived alone, my thermostat would be at 85 degrees year round. So when it comes to fall/winter fashion, all I want is comfort. The sweatshirt is the chili of the clothing world, right?


Disclaimer: I really dislike the fabric I used for this sweater (a sweater knit from Girl Charlee). It's a cotton/polyester blend and it was a huge PITA to sew, but at least I'm finally busting through all the stuff I ordered back in my stripe-crazy days. The green is too masculine for me and doesn't match anything in the Wardrobe Architect side of my closet. Despite that, I've worn this top like crazy because it's so comfortable and easy to wear.


You might look at this and think it's the new Linden pattern from Grainline, and I can see why you'd think that. But no, it's the poor sewist's version, Simplicity 1317. This is a size XS with two inches added to the bodice length. Did it need that two inches? Probably not. Another inch and it's entering tunic range. But I forgot I was adding a hem band when I was cutting the bodice, so there it is. The side seams on the pattern are straight, so it was easy to add length to the bottom. If you want some shaping from this pattern, you'll have to add it yourself.


This pattern is designed for knits with some body, like sweatshirt fleece and french terry. My fabric has much more drape than that, so I know that if/when I make this again, a different fabric will change the look completely. Construction is super fast and easy, and can be done on a serger alone. If you've made any raglan tops before then you know they are even easier to make than a regular t-shirt. The only thing that slowed me down was matching up stripes.


If I could change anything about this pattern, it might be to lower the neckline. This high-ish crew neck isn't my favorite and to me it says, again, masculine. If I can't tell the front from the back without studying the garment closely, then the neckline is too high. But perhaps I'm being too critical and in a different fabric it wouldn't bother me so much. Goodness knows I'm too lazy to change TWO pattern pieces (the sleeve and the front bodice) just to lower the neckline. Next time, I might cut the neckband more narrowly or use a deeper seam allowance.


This is basically a wearable muslin, as I have the most delicious quilted jersey (!!!) waiting to be used for this pattern. It's a very versatile pattern and if you don't have a loose raglan style in your arsenal, I definitely recommend it!

No back neck gape! Yay!

Are you on the raglan sweatshirt bandwagon with me? Have you bought the Linden or this Simplicity pattern?

10 comments:

  1. I made this tee 3 times for my daughter and it does go together quite fast.

    Like you, I think the Linden is cute but probably won't buy it (price + pdf) when I have this Simplicity pattern and the McCall's pattern (6992??).

    I was thinking of using the Simplicity pattern to make a tee for myself even though I know I should stay away from raglans with my narrow shoulders! But it's casual wear!!!! :-)

    Very nice top there and EXCELLENT stripe matching!

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    1. I actually didn't make any adjustments for my narrow shoulders, and it fits well. As long as the neckband is tight enough and not flapping around, you should be fine!

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  2. It looks great, I love it. You matched the stripes so well. I will trade you weather, ok?

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  3. Yay! I've got the poor person version too! So glad to see it made up, and in stripes :) Thanks for posting!

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    1. I can't help the fact that Simplicity came out with it first, right?!

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  4. I'm a total raglan sleeve convert these days too. I've been meaning to ask you, since you're the knit expert, do you ever use fusible interfacing on your raglan seams? I think you're supposed to use it on regular shoulder seams to prevent them from stretching. How about the neckline? Burda patterns often have you stabilizing a lot of seams, but I'm beginning to question the necessity of it. It really makes the supposedly fast and easy knit projects a bit tedious :/

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    1. This is a great question, and one I've been thinking about a lot myself. I think it's worthy of its own blog post...check back next week!

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  5. I have this pattern as well and hope to make it up this winter. Thanks for sharing.

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